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Sports Teams

Indiana Pacers

Pacers Roster

2012-13 Roster Num Player Pos Ht Wt DOB Prior to NBA/Country Yrs
14 D.J. Augustin G 6-0 183 11/10/1987 Texas/USA 4
24 Paul George F-G 6-8 221 05/02/1990 Fresno State/USA 2
33 Danny Granger F 6-8 228 04/20/1983 New Mexico/USA 7
25 Gerald Green F 6-8 210 01/26/1986 Gulf Shores Academy (TX)/USA 5
50 Tyler Hansbrough F-C 6-9 250 11/03/1985 North Carolina/USA 3
23 Ben Hansbrough G 6-3 203 12/23/1987 Notre Dame/USA R
55 Roy Hibbert C 7-2 280 12/11/1986 Georgetown/USA 4
3 George Hill G 6-2 190 05/04/1986 IUPUI/USA 4
11 Orlando Johnson G 6-5 220 03/11/1989 California-Santa Barbara/USA R
28 Ian Mahinmi C 6-11 230 11/05/1986 Pau Orthez/France 4
29 Jeff Pendergraph F-C 6-9 250 04/29/1987 Arizona State/USA 2
13 Miles Plumlee F 6-11 255 09/01/1988 Duke/USA R
1 Lance Stephenson G 6-5 228 09/05/1990 Cincinnati/USA 2
21 David West F 6-9 250 08/29/1980 Xavier (Ohio)/USA 9
4 Sam Young F-G 6-6 225 06/01/1985 Pittsburgh/USA 3

HEAD COACH Frank Vogel (College - Kentucky) ASSOCIATE HEAD COACH Brian Shaw (College - UC-Santa Barbara) ASSISTANT COACH(ES) Dan Burke (College - Portland State) Jim Boylen (College - Maine) STRENGTH-AND-CONDITIONING COACH Shawn Windle (College - Maine - Presque Isle) ATHLETIC TRAINER Josh Corbeil (College - Boston University) ASSISTANT TRAINER Carl Eaton (College - Lock Haven)

PACERS PLAYOFFS GENERAL PUBLIC TICKETS

Single game tickets for the three potential home games of the Second Round of the NBA Playoffs are now on sale . Pacers fans who wish to guarantee access to Playoff tickets through the NBA Finals can do so by purchasing a 2013-14 Full, Half, 13-Game, or 11-Game Season Ticket Plan . For fans who would like an opportunity to gain access to single game tickets to future rounds, sign up for the Single Game Ticket Opportunity .

History

Amazing Playoff Memories Can't get enough of Reggie Miller? Never want to forget the Memorial Day Miracle? Be sure to check out these five amazing highlights from the Pacers' playoff history. Complete Franchise History From the ABA to the NBA, from the State Fairgrounds Coliseum to Conseco Fieldhouse, from Larry Staverman to Rick Carlisle, travel down memory lane and take a look at the history of the Indiana Pacers.

31 & Only: Our Tribute To Reggie The retirement of Reggie Miller's No. 31, which humbled the Indiana icon, took on the feel of a family reunion, as his brothers and sisters shared in his big moment -- the celebration of a legendary career.

Indiana's 50 Greatest Players Who are the greatest players in Indiana's storied basketball history? In connection with the opening of Conseco Fieldhouse on Nov. 6, 1999, Pacers Sports & Entertainment commissioned a blue ribbon panel to help identify the 50 greatest players based on their basketball playing careers in Indiana only.

Remembering Market Square Arena In this gallery of photos taken exclusively for Pacers.com, watch the demolition of Market Square Arena, step by step. Though the building can be destroyed, the memories of what took place inside can not, as proven by submissions from our readers, franchise staff - and even a New York Knicks staffer.

Retired Numbers a Rare Honor Until Reggie Miller came along, Roger Brown, Mel Daniels, Bobby "Slick" Leonard and George McGinnis were the only four to have their numbers retired by the Pacers franchise. Read about what made these men legends on this special tribute page (.PDF). The Naming of the Pacers Ever wonder where the name "Pacers" came from? Pacers.com has the answer.

2012-13 Pacers Playoffs Statistics

Player Averages Rebounds Player G GS MPG FG% 3p% FT% OFF DEF TOT APG SPG BPG TO PF PPG
Paul George 12 12 41.5 0.404 0.271 0.710 1.30 7.00 8.30 5.0 1.75 0.58 3.58 3.75 19.1
George Hill 11 11 36.9 0.409 0.324 0.826 0.30 3.90 4.20 4.4 1.00 0.27 2.36 1.73 15.6
David West 12 12 34.9 0.470 0.000 0.830 1.60 5.30 6.80 2.3 0.75 0.67 2.33 2.67 15.5
Roy Hibbert 12 12 34.8 0.473 0.000 0.807 4.60 5.00 9.60 1.6 0.17 2.50 2.08 3.83 14.0
Lance Stephenson 12 12 34.1 0.437 0.268 0.593 0.60 7.50 8.10 3.3 1.08 0.08 1.75 1.83 9.8
Gerald Green 7 0 13.0 0.432 0.379 1.000 0.30 1.10 1.40 0.4 0.00 0.14 0.71 0.86 7.3
D.J. Augustin 12 1 18.2 0.371 0.395 0.783 0.10 1.00 1.10 0.8 0.58 0.00 0.58 1.42 6.8
Tyler Hansbrough 12 0 14.2 0.375 0.000 0.633 2.20 1.20 3.30 0.3 0.42 0.00 1.08 2.50 4.1
Jeff Pendergraph 7 0 9.4 0.318 0.000 0.000 0.60 2.00 2.60 0.1 0.00 0.14 0.43 2.00 2.0
Ian Mahinmi 11 0 8.4 0.421 0.000 0.333 1.20 1.50 2.60 0.1 0.00 0.73 0.64 1.55 1.6
Sam Young 8 0 7.4 0.308 0.167 0.750 0.80 1.10 1.90 0.4 0.13 0.13 0.38 1.00 1.5
Orlando Johnson 7 0 2.7 0.143 0.500 0.571 0.00 0.30 0.30 0.0 0.00 0.00 0.14 0.00 1.0
Ben Hansbrough 4 0 3.8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.30 0.30 0.50 0.8 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.25 0.0
Team Averages 12 0 240.0 0.420 0.308 0.741 12.67 34.67 47.33 18.2 5.75 5.08 15.92 21.42 92.0
Opponents 12 0 240.0 0.416 0.343 0.735 9.58 27.92 37.50 17.2 7.33 4.00 11.25 25.17 89.4
Player Totals Rebounds Player G GS MIN FGM-A 3PM-A FTM-A OFF DEF TOT AST STL BLK TO PF PTS
Paul George 12 12 498 72-178 19-70 66-93 15 84 99 60 21 7 43 45 229
David West 12 12 419 71-151 0-3 44-53 19 63 82 27 9 8 28 32 186
George Hill 11 11 406 56-137 22-68 38-46 3 43 46 48 11 3 26 19 172
Roy Hibbert 12 12 418 61-129 0-0 46-57 55 60 115 19 2 30 25 46 168
Lance Stephenson 12 12 409 45-103 11-41 16-27 7 90 97 40 13 1 21 22 117
D.J. Augustin 12 1 218 23-62 17-43 18-23 1 12 13 9 7 0 7 17 81
Gerald Green 7 0 91 19-44 11-29 2-2 2 8 10 3 0 1 5 6 51
Tyler Hansbrough 12 0 170 15-40 0-0 19-30 26 14 40 4 5 0 13 30 49
Ian Mahinmi 11 0 92 8-19 0-0 2-6 13 16 29 1 0 8 7 17 18
Jeff Pendergraph 7 0 66 7-22 0-1 0-0 4 14 18 1 0 1 3 14 14
Sam Young 8 0 59 4-13 1-6 3-4 6 9 15 3 1 1 3 8 12
Orlando Johnson 7 0 19 1-7 1-2 4-7 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 7
Ben Hansbrough 4 0 15 0-4 0-3 0-0 1 1 2 3 0 1 2 1 0
Team Totals 12 0 2,880 382-909 82-266 258-348 152 416 568 218 69 61 191 257 1,104
Opponents 12 0 -- 397-955 85-248 194-264 115 335 450 206 88 48 135 302 1,073

Indianapolis Colts

History Highlights

Briefly:
A look at the history of the Indianapolis Colts

View the Year-By-Year History Highlights

Professional football came to Indianapolis March 28, 1984, when Colts Owner Robert Irsay moved the historic NFL franchise from Baltimore to Indianapolis - the friendly heart of the midwest.

The roots of the franchise go back to December 28, 1946, when the bankrupt Miami Seahawks of the All-America Football Conference were purchased and relocated in Baltimore by a group headed by Bob Rodenberg. As the result of a contest in Baltimore, won by Charles Evans of Middle River, Md., the team was renamed the "Colts." On September 7, 1947, wearing green and silver uniforms, the Colts, under Head Coach Cecil Isbell, won their initial AAFC game, 16-7, over the Brooklyn Dodgers. The team concluded its inaugural season before a record Baltimore crowd of 51,583 by losing to the New York Yankees, 21-7. The Colts finished with a 2-11-1 record, good for a fourth place finish in the Eastern Division. The Colts completed the 1948 season with a 7-8 record, tying the Buffalo Bills for the division title. The Colts compiled a 1-11 mark in 1949.

The AAFC and NFL merged in 1950, and the Colts joined the NFL. After posting a 1-11 record for the second consecutive year, the franchise was dissolved by the league on January 18, 1951, because of its failing financial condition.

After two seasons without professional football, NFL Commissioner Bert Bell challenged the franchise in December of 1952 to sell 15,000 season tickets within six weeks in order to re-enter the NFL. That 15,000-ticket quota was reached in four weeks and three days. On January 23, 1953, under the principal ownership of Carroll Rosenbloom, the NFL's Dallas Texans franchise was moved to Baltimore where, keeping the "Colts" nickname, the Texans team colors of blue and white were inherited.

Before their first NFL season, the "new" Baltimore Colts engineered one of the biggest trades in sports history. In a deal with Cleveland involving 15 players, Baltimore received 10 Browns in exchange for five Colts. Among the players traded to Baltimore were Don Shula, Bert Rechichar, Carl Taseff and Art Spinney. These players helped the Colts open 1953 with a 13-9 upset of Chicago in a game where Rechichar booted a then-NFL record 56-yard field goal. In 1954, the Colts hired Weeb Ewbank as head coach. Ewbank guided the Colts for the nine seasons (the longest tenure of any Colts head coach) and won two conference and NFL championships. On November 30, 1958, the Colts clinched their first Western Conference title with a 35-27 win over San Francisco before a record home sellout crowd of 57,557. Four weeks later, Baltimore won its first NFL title, downing the New York Giants, 23-17, in the fabled "sudden-death" overtime contest at Yankee Stadium. The Colts repeated as champion in 1959, clinching their second conference crown and defeating the Giants, 31-16, in Baltimore for the NFL Championship.

In 1963, Shula replaced Ewbank as the team's third head coach since 1953. During 1963, QB- John Unitas led the Colts offense to eight team records and set a then-NFL seasonal mark of 237 completions. The Colts won a then club-record eleven consecutive games in 1964, en route to clinching their third conference title. That season, WR-Raymond Berry caught his 506th career pass and RB-Lenny Moore scored 20 touchdowns, then both NFL records. In 1965, Baltimore tied Green Bay for the conference title. With HB-Tom Matte quarterbacking the club because of injuries to Unitas and Gary Cuozzo, the Colts lost a controversial 13-10 "sudden-death" playoff contest to the Packers. Under Shula, Baltimore made its first Super Bowl appearance in 1968. The club won the Coastal Division with a 13-1 mark, then defeated Minnesota, 24-14, in the Western Conference Championship game and blanked Cleveland, 34-0, for the NFL Championship. The team faced the American Football League Champion New York Jets in Super Bowl III, losing a 16-7 upset.

In May of 1969, the NFL merged with the AFL and Baltimore, Pittsburgh and Cleveland joined the old AFL teams to form the American Football Conference of the NFL. As members of the AFC Eastern Division, the Colts won their first AFC game, 16-14, over San Diego on September 20. After clinching the division title, the Colts topped Cincinnati, 17-0, and Oakland, 27-17, to win the AFC Championship. On January 17, 1971, the Colts defeated Dallas in Super Bowl V, 16-13, on K-Jim O'Brien's 32-yard field goal with five seconds remaining in the game.

In July, 1972, the Colts came under new ownership as Robert Irsay acquired the club from Rosenbloom in exchange for the Los Angeles Rams. In 1974, two Colts set NFL records as RB-Lydell Mitchell rushed 40 times at the New York Jets and QB-Bert Jones completed 17 consecutive passes versus the Jets. Mitchell led the NFL with 72 receptions. In 1975, Mitchell became the first Colts player with a 1,000+ season by gaining 1,193 yards on 289 rushes. After a 2-12 record in 1974, Baltimore's fortunes changed with the hiring of Ted Marchibroda as head coach in February, 1975. Marchibroda led the Colts to three consecutive division titles before posting consecutive 5-11 seasons in 1978 and 1979. Mike McCormack replaced Marchibroda as head coach in January, 1980. The Colts improved to 7-9 in 1980 before recording a 2-14 mark in 1981. On December 21, 1981, Frank Kush succeeded McCormack as head coach. After two weeks of action in 1982, a players' strike resulted in the loss of seven games, and the NFL played a nine-game schedule. The Colts finished with a record of 0-8-1. The Colts received the first pick of the 1983 NFL Draft and selected QB-John Elway. Six days later, the Colts traded Elway to Denver for OT-Chris Hinton, QB- Mark Herrmann and its D1-84 pick. In 1983, the Colts finished 7-9, forging the biggest turnaround in NFL history for a team that had gone winless the previous season. Hinton started at RG in the Pro Bowl. RBs-Curtis Dickey and Randy McMillan combined for nearly 2,000 rushing yards as the club led the AFC and ranked second in the NFL.

Following the 1984 season, President Robert Irsay and General Manager Jim Irsay appointed Rod Dowhower as head coach on January 28, 1985. Indianapolis earned a 5-11 mark with a club that rushed for a conference-leading 2,439 yards, fifth-best in the NFL. The team's 5.0 rushing average marked the first time in a decade an AFC team achieved that feat. On December 1, 1986, Ron Meyer succeeded Dowhower as head coach. Meyer led the club to the division title in 1987, before falling in the divisional round at Cleveland, 38-21. Indianapolis earned a 9-7 record in 1988 and an 8-8 mark in 1989, but lost playoff positions on the last weekend of each season. RB-Eric Dickerson, acquired in a blockbuster trade on October 31, 1987, won the NFL rushing title in 1988 with 1,659 yards. The Colts were 7-9 in 1990. Meyer earned a 36-35 regular-season record before being succeeded by Rick Venturi on October 1, 1991. Marchibroda returned as head coach on January 28, 1992. He led the Colts to a 9-7 record in 1992, the second time he guided the team to a then NFL-best eight-game one-season turnaround. The Colts posted a 4-12 record in 1993 and an 8-8 mark in 1994. The 1995 Colts earned a 9-7 record and gained playoff wins at San Diego and Kansas City before falling, 20-16, at Pittsburgh in the AFC Championship Game. Marchibroda's tenure ended on February 9, 1996. His 73 career victories tied Shula for most in Colts history. Lindy Infante became head coach on February 15, 1996. The Colts were 9-7 in 1996, reaching the playoffs in consecutive seasons for the first time since 1975-77.

Jim Irsay became Owner and Chief Executive Officer in 1997, and Bill Polian was named president on December 22, 1997, one day after the club finished a 3-13 season. Jim Mora succeeded Infante as head coach on January 12, 1998. The Colts were 3-13 in 1998. RB-Marshall Faulk's 2,227 scrimmage yards set a club seasonal mark, while QB-Peyton Manning (326-575-3,739, 26 TDs) set NFL rookie records in every passing category. At 13-3 in 1999, the Colts produced an NFL-record 10-game one-season turnaround. The club won eleven straight games, tying then the franchise record achieved in 1964 and 1975-76. In winning the division title, Manning, RB-Edgerrin James and WR-Marvin Harrison earned Pro Bowl honors, while K-Mike Vanderjagt won the NFL scoring title. The club earned its first playoff game in Indianapolis, but fell to Tennessee, 19-16. The Colts were 10-6 in 2000, but lost in overtime at Miami, 23-17, in the Wild Card round. The back-to-back 10+-victory seasons were a first for the club since 1976-77. Manning (4,413) and James (1,709, 2,303) won the NFL passing, rushing and scrimmage yards titles. The Colts were 6-10 in 2001, but Manning (4,131) and Harrison (109) had outstanding yardage and reception seasons.

Tony Dungy succeeded Mora as head coach on January 22, 2002. In 2002, Dungy led the Colts to a 10-6 record before losing in the Wild Card round at the New York Jets, 41-0. Manning became the first NFL player with four consecutive 4,000+ seasons, while Harrison set the NFL seasonal record with 143 receptions and became the only NFL player with 100+ receptions in four consecutive seasons.

In 2003, the Colts were 12-4, won the AFC South and advanced to the AFC Championship Game, falling at New England, 24-14. Manning produced his fifth consecutive 4,000+ season, while Vanderjagt set an NFL record with 41 consecutive field goals, including all 37 attempts in 2003. Dungy led the Colts to a 12-4 mark and the AFC South title in 2004. Manning set NFL seasonal records with 49 touchdown passes (since broken) and a 121.1 rating, while the club set seasonal-bests with 522 points and 6,475 net yards. The Colts topped Denver, 49-24, in the Wild Card round before losing at New England, 20-3. In 2005, Dungy directed the Colts to a 14-2 record, then the franchise record for seasonal wins. The club became then only the fourth in NFL history to earn a 13-0 start. The club fell in the Divisional Playoffs to Pittsburgh, 21-18. Dungy earned his 100th career and 100th regular season victories in 2005, while the Colts passed 400 wins in franchise history. In 2006, the Colts posted a 12-4 record and captured the fourth world championship in franchise history with a 29-17 win over Chicago in Super Bowl XLI in Miami Gardens, Fla. The club defeated Chicago after besting three prior playoffs foes, Kansas City (23-8), Baltimore (15-6) and New England (38-34). In 2007, the Colts finished 13-3, winning a club-record fifth straight division title and becoming the first NFL team with five consecutive seasons with 12+ victories. The club fell in the Divisional Playoffs to San Diego, 28-24. In 2008, the Colts were 12-4, extending their league mark with six consecutive 12+-victory seasons. The club became the first in NFL history to win at least seven consecutive games in five consecutive seasons. Manning won his third AP NFL MVP award. Indianapolis fell in the Wild Card Playoffs in overtime at San Diego, 23-17. Jim Caldwell succeeded Dungy as head coach on January 12, 2009. Dungy finished as the only coach in Colts history to post 10+ wins and earn playoff appearances in seven straight seasons. In 2009, the club was 14-2 and became only the third team to start a season 14-0. The club extended its records to seven consecutive seasons with 12+ victories and with a winning streak exceeding seven games. Caldwell tied the rookie mark for seasonal victories by an NFL head coach, and he earned the most consecutive wins to open a season and a career by a first-year head coach. Manning won an unprecedented fourth AP MVP honor. The club set league marks for most consecutive regular-season wins (23, 2008-09) and most regular-season decade wins (115, 2000-09). Indianapolis defeated Baltimore, 20-3, and the New York Jets, 30-17, before falling to New Orleans, 31-17, in Super Bowl XLIV in Miami Gardens, Fla.

In 57 years of National Football League competition, the Colts have achieved a 460-409-7 record, including four World Championships and 18 Conference or Divisional titles.

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